Japanese Chicken Curry

I’ve had this one saved up for you for some time. It’s another one of those recipes that I knew I had to make as soon as I saw it. This tempting Japanese Curry comes by way of Biren from the inspiring food blog Roti n Rice. Her recipes are always mouth-watering but this particular one sang a siren song that simply captured me. I couldn’t resist. As Biren points out, many don’t think curry when they think Japanese food. But it’s not all sushi and tempura in Japan, and curry is another delicious staple.

As opposed to Thai curries, which are often made with coconut milk, and Indian curries, which often contain cream, the Japanese curry relies on a roux to thicken it up. I love the slight sweetness that comes from the addition of apple juice, and the deep curry flavor that results from making a roux with spices and Worcestershire sauce. As someone who puts some sort of curry on the table at least once a week this was just what I needed to switch things up. Make this, you won’t be sorry.

5.0 from 3 reviews

Japanese Chicken Curry
 
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This flavorful curry is easy enough for a weeknight and will please everyone in the family. Serve over rice or noodles.
Author:
Recipe Type: Entree
Yield: 4 Servings

Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 2 medium sized onions, chopped
  • 1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breast or thighs, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 2 carrots, sliced
  • 1½ cups apple juice
  • ¾ cup water
  • 5-6 medium sized potatoes, cut into bite size pieces
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 3 tablespoons flour (substitute rice flour for gluten free)
  • 2 tablespoons curry powder
  • 1 tablespoons garam masala
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 tablespoon ketchup
  • 1 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 cup frozen green peas
  • Salt and pepper

Directions
  1. Heat the canola oil in a pot over medium heat and brown the onions, about 5 minutes. Add the chicken and allow to brown for another few minutes, stirring often. Add the carrots and stir. Pour in the apple juice and water and allow to come to a boil. Lower the heat and allow to simmer for 5 minutes, skimming off fat as it appears. Add the potatoes and continue to simmer for another 20 minutes, or until tender.
  2. Meanwhile, prepare the roux. Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add the flour and stir until smooth. Stir in the curry powder, garam masala, and cayenne pepper. Add the ketchup and Worcestershire sauce and continue to stir until well incorporated. Remove and set aside.
  3. When the meat and vegetables are ready, create a slurry by ladling 2 cups of hot liquid into the roux and mixing until smooth. Pour the mixture back into the pot and stir until thickened. Add the green peas and allow to cook through. Season with salt and pepper and serve.

Notes
Gluten free (substitute rice flour) Tofu would probably be excellent for a vegan/vegetarian version

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26 Comments

  1. Huh, you’re right. I didn’t know curry was popular in Japan. Thanks; this looks tasty and easy (my fave combination!).

  2. Oh dear, this looks so delicious..awesome recipe and fantastic photos..better said mouthwatering photos:))

  3. This sounds fantastic and the photos totally make me want to eat some now lol.

  4. Your curry looks awesome and the picture is stunning! Makes me want to cook this again soon :) So glad you like the recipe and thank you so much for the kind mention. You’ve made my day!

    • Biren I’m so glad you approve of my rendition :-D Thank you so much for such an amazing recipe! It was seriously delicious. I will be making this often!

  5. Interesting curry dish. I do like the roux in place of the coconut milk and then of course, the spices you use are irresistible. It seems like it’s a lighter curry than Thai curry. I guess I’ll have to make it and find out. :) Beautiful and beautifully tasty dish!

    • Thank you! Yes, the roux intrigued me as well. Although the base is lighter than other curries it does end up thickening quite a bit and is very hearty. The apple juice adds just a hint of sweetness. I hope you enjoy it if you give it a shot!

  6. Never had a Japanese curry, but it seems so tasty!! I should try it.. I loooove curry :)

  7. I don’t think I’ve ever used a roux in curry – I tend towards coconut milk, tomato or even a little stock or water. Your Japanese curry looks lovely – very light and fresh. Will definitely be giving this a try!

    • Using roux in curry was new to me as well! I always have coconut milk on hand and probably make a coconut curry at least twice a week, so I really enjoyed this alternative. I hope you do too!

  8. Ohhh you made Japanese curry Katherine! Looks delicious! Curry is a very hart to take pictures and you did a beautiful job!

  9. Oh this curry sounds amazing! I’m used to the Thai and Indian varieties here, but the Japanese version sounds pretty darn delicious (and similar) too! Can’t wait to try this one myself =)

    • Thank you Peggy! I am definitely more accustomed to the Thai and Indian varieties as well, which is why this Japanese version was such a nice change! Let me know how it comes out if you do make it!

  10. Oh, this looks absolutely delicious, that’s the kind of recipe I like a lot.

  11. Thanks for such post I am beginning to be less ignorant of foreign cuisines. I did not know curry dishes are popular in Japan. Great to learn something new today. I am excited to try Japanese food today, a Curry dish at that. Thanks again…

  12. This is a beauty, Katherine. Thanks for linking up at A Little Nosh this week!

  13. I am excited to make this – I found it interesting when I moved back to the states from Japan that not a lot of people knew what curry was let alone the Japanese style curry I fell in love with over there – when we climbed Mnt Fuji this dish is what they serve you at the stations located on your way up – it is filling and healthy – I am hoping this recipe can fulfill that taste I have longed for – I think the apple sauce may do the trick!!

    • I hope it lives up to your memories Amanda!! I haven’t had it in Japan, so you’ll have to let me know how it compares :-)

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